Mary Ann would have liked it had she been sitting with me.  The music was powerful, to her liking.  The sermon was centered on our hope and the certain promise that is the only thing that frees us to face the struggles, lament the losses, and come out alive and well.

It would have pleased Mary Ann to have Niece Diana and husband Al sitting with us. Diana, who simply does not fly no matter what, flew here to honor her Aunt Mary Ann.  Diana was the only one of our two families who was invited to stand up with us at our wedding.  They have always had a special relationship.

Our blood relatives were expanded by our adopted brothers and sisters from Kansas City, three remarkable people who had special roles with the Volunteers (by now totaling at least 70-80 over the years), members of the Spiritual Formation Group that has been a source of strength for the last 8-9 years.

Lot’s of our family and close friends who could not make such a long trip from Northern Illinois on such short notice will have an opportunity in the near future when a date is set to gather there for an event to celebrate and remember Mary Ann. It will include a short worship segment to help clarify just what has happened here and the hope that sustains us.  There will also be food to sustain us.

Have I told you yet that I really don’t like this.  I just thought I would mention it, in case you were unaware of it.

I suppose there were a couple of hundred people who attended the funeral today. What a testimony to the lives that Mary Ann has touched.  As Lutherans are wont to do, they sang loudly, filling that room with the declaration that in the face of death life has won again.  There were instrumentalists, one whose Father is thirty-two years into Parkinson’s, another who lost a Mother and a Sister to forms of Alzheimer’s. The full organ lifted our spirits.  If there were 200 people there, there were pretty close to 200 hugs that helped me and the Kids.

The vocalists included Carol, who has sung for decades and directed the choir here for many years before I arrived.  Her “Now the Green Blade Rises” burrowed into me as I began to feel the significance of the central message of the service.  Kristen’s “Consecration” took the breath away from every one of us in that room. It was done to honor all those who ministered to Mary Ann as Volunteers. I knew Mary Ann would have been especially pleased when Kristen sang “Laudatus Dominum” by Mozart.  It was certainly not possible for me to keep my composure when she sang.  I needed that release.  It was so meaningful that Kristen took time to fly in from Boston to sing. There is no one at any level whose voice is more beautiful than hers.

The readings and the words of Pastor Jim and Pastor Mike drew us to the One in whom we trust, the only One who has the power to make a difference at a time like this.  They celebrated the faith of Mary Ann who has a joyful and secure future that we would not presume to describe but to which we look forward as we journey on after death has done its worst.

Last night was a fairly restful one other than the early declarations of a wayward blackberry that decided 5:45am would be a good time to start the day.  It only took one roll back and forth under the tires of the van to solve that problem.  (Only kidding, Denis.)

I was, of course, very restless this morning, pacing back and forth.  I connected with PT’s Coffee to be sure all was well for a delivery for the dinner after the service.  I had made clear that I was not asking for a favor but would pay for that treat.  When the Kids went to pay for it, Co-owner and friend Jeff would take no payment.  A number of folks confirmed that the coffee was great.

The waterfall stopped again this afternoon, but it was only a GFI outlet.  We don’t know why it popped, but we hope it doesn’t do it again.  Brad, who built the pondless waterfall, came by almost immediately to determine the problem.

Tomorrow brings even more finality to this leg of life’s journey.  There will be a very short committal service at the grave side late in the morning.  It is called an Inurnment since there will be ashes (cremains) in an urn to be buried.  Again, since Mary Ann has already gone on her way, it is simply the period at the end of the sentence.  I don’t really know how that will feel.  Today’s service was very moving especially with the powerful music. Tomorrow’s includes a few short readings and spoken words only.

The Kids have chosen not all to leave at the same time so that I will be eased into a full encounter with the empty house.  I have lots of grieving to do.  I will need time alone to do some of it.  Just as I did during the years with Mary Ann, I plan to experience fully this leg of the journey.  I am convinced that embracing whatever is going on is the best way to get through it and on to what comes next.  If I try to short-circuit the process, avoid the pain at all cost, I will be left to carry the baggage of unfinished business.  If I do that, it will most certainly catch up at some time.  I do not want to wallow in it, nor do I want to waste the pain. I want to feel it and learn from it. That will be a lasting gift to me from Mary Ann and a way for me to honor who she has been during her time here with me.  Doing the work will allow me to get on with the life I am being given unencumbered by regrets and denial.

By the way, have I told you yet that I really don’t like this.  I just thought I would mention it, in case you didn’t remember.

It is time to sleep.

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I had my own little package of Kleenexes in my pocket; there were plenty around the room.  We didn’t need them.  They had done a nice job of fixing her up, but her face did not really look like her.  I was pleased.  We had all been there when she left, so the private viewing at the funeral home only confirmed that she was already gone.

We are not done with the tears — by no means is that part of this over.  The tears will come tomorrow when we gather to confront the impact of her loss and at the same time celebrate what in our Spiritual Tradition (Christian of the Lutheran variety) we believe to be a victory.  We understand death to be a real and painful loss for us and a profound victory over death.  The Parkinson’s and Parkinson’s Dementia have done their worst and lost the war.  We still have to work through all the grief that comes with such a loss, just not complicated by a sense of defeat and concern for the one who has died. My mantra has been, “She is fine. We are not.”

This afternoon, there was a time when all the rest of the family was away from the house when I walked in.  As far as I know, except for two or three times when I stopped by to pick something up while she was at her Tuesday Morning Bible Study, that is the first time in the last two years I have walked into the house without Mary Ann being here.  Actually, in the last eight or ten years, I don’t remember that happening for more than a moment to pick up something at the house while she was with someone else in another place. It struck me pretty powerfully.  It was not long before some of the family returned, but it was long enough to determine that I don’t like it.  Have I mentioned before that I don’t like this?

There is nothing anyone else can do about it.  The last thing I want is for people to try to insulate me from the reality of what is going on.  I need to experience it and get used to it.  Any who read this who happen to have lost someone and returned home to live in an empty house understand full well that we have to learn how to accept and come to terms with that new reality.

Tonight we spent over two hours greeting people who came by the funeral home to show their support for our family.  It was pretty much hugs all around.  There were many words of comfort.  There were many who offered to help in any way they could, inviting me to call or come by, threatening to pester me with their care.  They actually meant it.  I know these people.  They meant it.   For a while, I will need to hang back and get my bearings, but it is nice to know that to the degree I am willing to be assertive, I will not need to stay home alone unless I want to.  I like solitude, but I will need to find a balance between solitude and community to remain healthy.

I now know why when talking with people who have lost a spouse sometimes they get a catch in their throat when they talk about the last moments of their Loved One’s life if they were there — even if the death came years earlier.  Images of those last moments elicit great pangs of pain.  I doubt that the capacity to feel those pangs will leave very soon if ever.  I cherish those moments only to confirm for me that it is good that she let go, that she is no longer enduring the indignity of those last hours.  It frees me not to fight the acceptance, somehow wishing her back here.

We are all very tired now. It is time to try to get some rest.  I slept better last night — a very good thing.  Tomorrow will be a day to begin the healing in earnest.

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I just couldn’t stop and go to bed.  I needed, I NEEDED, to empty the bedroom of everything I could find that reminded me of what we have been through with the Parkinson’s .  Gratefully, the Hospice folks had taken all the medicine bottles and the items they brought that were of no further use to us now that Mary Ann is free of the damned disease.  It did its worst, and she still won.  She has let go of it so that it has no power over her any longer.  She has a life that is as free as a butterfly, a favorite image of hers, especially in the early years.

I am not about to let the Parkinson’s Disease and the Parkinson’s Disease Dementia (a Dementia with Lewy Bodies) remain the dominant feature of our lives any more.  Pretending it never happened would be silly and deny who we became as we faced it down and refused to let it steal from us meaning and joy and fulfillment.  With that said, I don’t have to allow it to come along any longer on my journey, just as she no longer has its company in her new life.

For both of us, we now are living life after Parkinson’s.  I stripped the bed and put on fresh bedding.  At this point, I don’t even remember all the things I threw away — nothing that needed to be kept any longer.  Finally, I went to bed.  It was a fitful sleep, up a couple of times, now for no good reason.  This morning beginning at about 4:30am, my mind started working.  Every time I thought of something that I needed to do, I got up headed down the hall to my office, wrote it down and came back to bed.  I did that four or five times between then and a little before 7am.

Today has included lots of tasks.  Throughout the day, I have been reading comments on this blog and on Facebook that have provided comfort and the recognition that we are not going through this alone.  We have welcomed more food and enjoyed eating part or most of much of it, while freezing for later what we cannot consume now.  There are some really fine cooks in our circle of support.  I was able to get a much needed freely given haircut from friend and former parishioner Doug this afternoon.  Marikay’s Volunteering with Mary Ann was doing her hair there at their shop.

Son Micah wrote the obituary for us this morning so that we could take it with us to meet with Pat the Funeral Director working with us.  As I mentioned in last night’s post we were treated more like friends than clients as we went through all the necessary steps.  Having made the arrangements in advance seven years ago, it was a relatively painless process.  It still took a couple of hours to go through all the paperwork that is required.  The web site with Mary Ann’s obituary is http://www.penwellgabeltopeka.com.  Enter Mary Ann Tremain in the search box and then when her name comes up, click on her name to see the obituary.  I think the link we provided on Facebook will take you right to it in one step. Having done the pre-need plan at the cemetery, that visit was only a few minutes.

We stopped at church for a while.  The Staff there was a sort of family for the over twelve years I served there.  They listened as I shared the daily struggles.  They provided a wonderful, nurturing community.  We dropped off what has turned out to be an elegantly done, indescribably beautiful book mark that will serve as a thank you to those who have volunteered in any way to help Mary Ann over the years.

The main reason for stopping at the church was to talk about the music with Young, the Director of Worship and the Organist.  She led us to the balcony and sat down at the console to play some of what she will use as processional and recessional music as well as a hymn prelude and accompaniment.  I have absolutely no defense mechanisms capable of deflecting the power of a full organ playing music that simply soars heavenward.  It is not sweet and gentle or somber and sad.  It is energizing and thrilling and victorious.  I simply melted.  Each time she stopped and asked if that was all right, I could only nod, yes.  I could not talk.  I am in real trouble as far as trying to keep my composure on Thursday is concerned.

Later in the afternoon, I was by myself with some time to fill between the cemetery trip and the haircut.  I stopped at Lowe’s to look for some much needed deck chairs and a hose caddy.  I wandered into Barnes and Noble just to spend time before going for the haircut.  I got scared, especially when I walked around Barnes and Noble.  Everything that has given me purpose for my lifetime up to now has ended.  I have completed a career, I am done living with and caring for Mary Ann.  She is even what I have written about, her care the content of the blog.  I got scared about what I will do when the funeral and memorial up north are over, the house is in order and the thank you cards written.  Will I be wandering about aimlessly, a pathetic old man with no where to go and nothing to do.  It just scared me for a moment.

With that said, I will be fine.  Very many other people who lose a spouse after retiring have exactly the same problem.  “What do I do now?”  Gratefully, there will be time to think about that later.  Right now, there is a lot that will be going on in the next couple of weeks.

When I returned home after the haircut, Son Micah had orchestrated the removal of some of the bigger items in the house because of the Parkinson’s. I had shared with him earlier my need to rid the place of all the signs that it was ever present.  They took up the protective mesh from the ceramic tile floor in the bathroom.  We put it down after Mary Ann did some real damage in a fall.  They took up the matting for the same purpose in the garage.  The rolling shower chair, the wheel chair in the car, the support handles around the toilet stools were all removed to the garage for the moment.

Yes, part of it is that I need time to forget the horrible sight of Mary Ann suffering so much at the end.  I need not to remain immersed in remembering and focusing on the caregiving tasks of the last decade.  I need to remember Mary Ann, the person, “a force to be reckoned with” someone said, and a wonderful, exciting life’s partner.  Yes, we have been shaped by responding to the challenge; we have grown.  At the same time, we are far more than the disease.  I want to remember the “more.”

Now that she is gone, I have nothing to write about.  While I try to decide whether to just stop writing, I will describe and reflect on what is going on during these first  transitional days.  I will write a post or two on the beginnings and development of our life together.  There is a huge hole filled with pain right now.  I need to remember, reconstruct the memory of that life, lift the fog of the Parkinson’s so that the wonder of it will reappear.  I expect what I write to be boring and self-serving, but that is just the way it is.  I started writing these posts each night to find the perspective I needed to survive, to make some sense out of something that makes no sense.  I hoped they would help anyone in similar circumstances who happened upon the blog.  I have been blown away by how many have become a part of our journey in the past couple of years and especially the past few weeks.

As little as I could predict about what we would encounter day by day as we fought the Parkinson’s and the Dementia, I know even less now about what will come next.  Mary Ann is experiencing a spectacular new beginning beyond our knowing.  I am also experiencing a new beginning.  As cliche as it is to say it, today actually is the first day in the rest of my life. So far I am not liking it very well, but given time, that will change.

Plans are now final.  The Mary Ann’s funeral will be at 11:30am on Thursday at the church with a visitation at the funeral home tomorrow evening from 6pm to 8pm.  She will lie in state there from 2pm on tomorrow.  We will have private family time with her at noon. She will lie in state at church an hour before the funeral.  There will be a meal afterward at church to which we hope as many as can attend will come.  On Friday we will have a very short inurnment service with mostly family at the graveside.

If you want to write a comment about this or any of the posts on this blog, look to the column on the right side of this page, titled “Recent Posts,”  click on the name of a post and you will find a box at the end of that article in which you can write a comment.  Clicking on the title of the post you are reading will accomplish the same thing.  Comments are appreciated.

We thought the end had come this morning when the bath aide and Daughter Lisa and I were working on her.  She made some awful sounds and her eyes opened wide and rolled back, then she stopped breathing.  After only seconds, she started breathing again.

Poor Bathe Aide Zandra left during that time to let us be with her.  I grabbed a Bible and tried to read a couple of Psalms.  Words and tears mixed, mostly tears.  In a few minutes Mary Ann stabilized to a steady heart beat and steady breathing.

Zandra had pointed out some of the telltale mottling on the bottoms of her feet.  That was at about 9:45am.  We called Hospice Nurse Emily who came out to put a dressing on one of the sores that had developed.  Her blood pressure was low, and the oxygen saturation percentage was lowering.  Gratefully, her lungs were still clear.  Mary Ann again made clear with some scary sounds that she was not happy with being moved.  Nurse Emily indicated the obvious, that it would probably be before the day was done, certainly by tomorrow that the end would come. Emily  was here late in the morning.

We kept close track of Mary Ann’s breathing, which remained pretty steady.  Then we saw that in just an hour or so, the mottling had moved from the bottoms of her feet all the way to her hips.  When we called Nurse Emily about how to determine when to use the Morphine, I told her about the mottling.  She said she would be over at 2pm, an hour from that call.

Emily talked with us for a while and shortly after she left, Mary Ann took what turned out to be her last breath.  We were all immediately at her side.  I had found one of the books I used in the ministry and put it nearby.  I read a beautifully written Commendation of the Dying liturgy.  She died during that couple of minutes.

It is hardly necessary to tell you what came next.  After I gained enough composure, I called Nurse Emily to record the time of death.  Nurse Lisa came first since she was closer.  Then Nurse Emily came and did the official recording of the time.  Nurse Emily and Nurse Lisa prepared Mary Ann for the funeral home to take her.  We had all the time we wanted before they came.

Daughter Lisa and Denis let their two little ones (5 and 7) come in to see Mary Ann. I have worked with families with children often in situations like this.  Letting children satisfy their curiosity and ask questions is very helpful.  It is better to treat things honestly without giving them more information than they want or need.  They need to hear that it is all right for their Parents and the Grandpa cry, and that their Grandma is okay even though she has died.  They need permission to be sad or silly or whatever they need to do.

Granddaughter Ashlyn (5) was mostly excited that she lost her very first baby tooth this afternoon.  She is counting on a very generous tooth fairy.

Son Micah and Becky came in next with eleven year old Granddaughter, Chloe.  This is her first Grandparent to die.  She just needed to do some crying and be nurtured by her Parents.  There were lots of hugs.

Denis took the girls to the park for a while so that they would not be there when the funeral home took Mary Ann out.  They had an appropriate experience without that.

We made all the phone calls we could think to make.  We checked to see if the Funeral could be at 11:30am on Thursday at the church (Faith Lutheran Church, 17th and Gage, Topeka, KS).  It appears that the day and time are acceptable to all parties.

There were more food deliveries today.  There have been emails and phone calls as the news has begun to spread.  At about 4:30pm Pat from Penwell Gabel Funeral home and a helper came to pick up Mary Ann.  I have done so many funerals with them in the dozen years before I retired that they are more friends than they are funeral home staff. Our appointment is set for 11am tomorrow.  We will take the dress and the pictures at that time.  Son Micah is working on a draft of the obituary.

Lisa and Micah have each been doing their grieving in ways that work for them.  There have been hugs and tears.  Each of them has a Spouse who provides them with love and support without limit.  Is is such a comfort to a Father to see that.

Pastor Mike came over and spent the next couple of hours with us, just talking about Mary Ann and our life together, as well as what might be in store for me.  It gave me a chance to talk, something I do especially when I am dealing with my feelings.  It is my mechanism for processing things.  It served as a way to keep at bay the sadness that is sitting in my gut.

I have to say that the sadness is much different from the pain of these last couple of weeks as I saw Mary Ann decline to a shadow of her former self.  The horribly painful knot in my stomach, feeling her pain, untied immediately after she died.  I want her back, but I could not tolerate seeing her in that condition any longer.  I find myself talking as if I am just fine, while just under the words are tears and sadness and a dull pain — a new one, different from before.

She no longer is in pain. That is the best news imaginable.  In my faith tradition there is no doubt that she has transitioned to a kind of joy and peace immersed in love beyond human comprehension. For those whose view of reality does not include a similar spirituality, the release from the pain and suffering of the last couple of weeks especially, is a great good.

My hope tonight is that I will share a bit in her peace by getting a good night’s sleep.  Whether or not I can sleep is another one of those things over which I have no control.  I am really getting tired of all the things over which I have no control!

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I have tried to write about our experience honestly.  To do so has required my revealing the harsh realities of painfully ordinary people.  I could try to create the illusion that we are a saintly household above all the weaknesses and failures and missteps that plague regular folks.  I could try, but this blog is not fiction.  It is too much work to make up stuff and keep it all straight.

I got up this morning after a night of watching her, feeling for her pulse, putting my hand on her chest to be sure she is breathing, getting up and putting my ear next to her mouth to be sure I could hear the breath going in and out.  I was tired and grumpy and angry.  Why does she have to be so stubborn?  Why can’t she just let go?  What a jerk I am to be angry at someone who has suffered so for so long and is now in the throes of dying!  I just can’t stand seeing her weak and vulnerable and in pain.  She would hate it!  She is a proud and strong-willed person, not about to be found to be weak.  I am not angry at her.  I am scared and sad and in pain with absolutely no one to blame.

I suppose I could waste a lot of time and energy being angry at God, but pain and suffering are not God’s idea.  God often gets the blame for the bad stuff (usually perpetrated by people doing the opposite of what He has asked us to do).  God more rarely gets credit for bothering to give us the breath of life and everything we just assume is our right, belongs to us.  I can’t waste my limited stamina being angry with the only One who can actually help both Mary Ann and me as we pass through this transition in our lives.

I wish I could cry, but I think the tears are waiting until this is over.  Every day seems like an entire lifetime.  This morning I was grumpy and angry.  I went to the computer to find that one of the other two in our online Lewy Body Dementia Spouses group at the same stage we are in lost her husband finally this morning.  Here is what I wrote to her:

Doris,
My thoughts are with you.  We are still in that time that has extended beyond the fear of the end to a longing for it to be over.  Rest now from your and Philip’s winding, uphill, exhausting and exciting journey to this point.  I wish you well as you take the best of what Philip has brought into your life, discover who you will become now that he is not with you here, and find joy and fulfillment when finally the pain finds a quiet place to remain as your own adventure continues.
Peter

Somehow reflecting on her loss, helped me regain a bit of perspective.  My anger and grumpiness are just a function of feeling utterly helpless, struggling to accept something I don’t want to accept, already missing horribly someone who has been in the center of my life for decades.  Yes, we could irritate the Hell out of each other sometimes, but that is precisely because we matter so much to each other.

The lifetime lived today included treating sores (none open yet), inserting Tylenol suppositories, cleaning and turning bones stretched with bruised skin over them, administering Morphine before the three times of turning to lessen the pain revealed by her grimacing as we worked on her.

The lifetime lived today included good friend and former co-worker Jim and Joanna, hugs and conversation and prayer.  A full, hot meal appeared at the door, delivered by Shari, member of our little Spiritual Formation group that meets for a couple of hours weekly.  Good Buddy Jimmy came by bearing a gift and concern for us.

Today’s lifetime included moments with Granddaughter Chloe, lots of words and acts of support for one another between Daughter Lisa, Son Micah, Daughter-in-Law Becky.  Today included the return of Son-in-Law Denis and Granddaughters, Abigail (who now wants to be called Abby) and Ashlyn, both full of energy and grateful to be in Mom’s arms again after being gone so long.

In today’s lifetime our downstairs bedroom and family room have become a campground.  It is very good that our small town home has three full bathrooms now that we have finished the downstairs and many people in it.

During this lifetime, the one lived today, fatigue has been a constant presence.  The consensus was that it would be good for me to go into the bedroom with Mary Ann, shut the door and just rest. Grumpy Grandpa is not their favorite family member.  I did so at least three times in this lifetime, today.  It helped.  Nothing can remove the tired with which I woke up, but it helped.

Lifetimes include sunshine and storms.  Today began with rumbling thunder, and moments ago the power went off for a moment, turning off the computer and the oxygen machine.  Needless to say, both are working again.

This day’s lifetime will now continue into the night.  At least intellectually, I have determined that it is not necessary for us to be awake and with Mary Ann at the moment of her death.  We love her and she knows it.  We have cared for her and doted on her for days.  Micah asked Lisa how long she has been here.  It has been eleven days that this watch has been going on.  It actually started two days earlier. We would love to have the privilege of surrounding her at that moment.  It is, however, not necessary for me to try to stay awake all night checking her breathing.  While I know that intellectually, we will see if knowing that has even a shred of influence on my insides and my actions.

If you want to write a comment about this or any of the posts on this blog, look to the column on the right side of this page, titled “Recent Posts,”  click on the name of a post and you will find a box at the end of that article in which you can write a comment.  Clicking on the title of the post you are reading will accomplish the same thing.  Comments are appreciated.

That was the question Son Micah asked.  He had not been with us at the time Hospice Social Worker Kristin answered some of those questions.  In forty years of ministry, I have become painfully aware of the process.

We will call Hospice.  The Nurse will come and make the declaration.  We will have all the time we want with the part of Mary Ann we can see, though life has left for another place.  The Nurse will call the Funeral Home to come and take pick her up to begin preparing her for the service.

We will begin going down the list of folks to notify.  I will not put anything on Facebook or the Blog until we have connected with as many as possible of those whom we intend to notify by phone or email.

When the funeral home vehicle arrives, we will send with them the dress, a picture to help them in their holy task of preparing her for viewing.  Once the Funeral Home folks have left, we will conclude the contacting, and try to begin processing what has happened.

We will set an appointment with a Funeral Director for the next day.  There will be an obituary to work out.  We will go over the plans we made many years ago.  Since we have those plans in place, we will not need to go to the casket room and make all sorts of decisions. They are already made.  We will need to write a check for the opening of the grave site into which the ashes will be placed the day after the service here.

One of the things I did today was work out a proposal for the flow of the service, the hymns and readings.  That job is normally left to the Pastor who will do the service.  Pastors are trained to do that, equipped to do that and experienced in doing it.  Since I served as a Pastor for forty years, Pr. Jim is willing for me to have input.  I finalized the hymns we prefer and did what I have done hundreds of times before.  I put them all together into a traditional Lutheran Funeral Service — admittedly, one with a little more music than usual.

It felt good to put that service together.  It did not feel good that the service will be for Mary Ann.  I couldn’t bring myself to actually write her name into the proposal I sent to Pr. Jim and Director of worship Young.  It just felt good to do something, something I know how to do.  Everything else is so completely out of my control, many of the things I am doing with Mary Ann are new to me, we don’t know from one moment to the next what will happen — it just felt good to accomplish something I am actually equipped to do.

We are all getting tired.  Sleep is tough to come by.  I get up at various times during the night to put my hand on Mary Ann to see if she is still breathing.  I wake up in the wee hours of the morning and just lie there, thinking and trying to doze a little.  The kids downstairs sleep fitfully, listening for my footsteps — reassured when they hear them and there is no pounding on the floor for them to come up.  Actually, I will also push the button Mary Ann used to push to get my attention when she needed me.  It is an electronic battery operated wireless doorbell system.

When I went out to run a couple of quick errands late this afternoon, Mary Ann’s breathing acted up, there were some odd and distressing movements, so the kids called and I came back quickly.  I appreciated that they called right away.  She seemed to settle down, but her breathing continues to be very shallow and a little less steady than it has been.  Otherwise, we remain in a holding pattern.  We keep hoping she will let go. It clearly is harder and harder on her when we move and shift her to avoid the bed sores.

Nurse Emily came and delivered some more briefs and adhesive pads for the red spots to keep them from becoming open sores if possible.  She reassured us that we are doing a good job of caring for Mary Ann.  When I asked about it, she said that when we see her in pain, it is better to give her the low dose more often than increase the dose.

I spend a lot of time talking with Mary Ann when I go in to be with her. I have talked about how fulfilling our life together has been.  Whatever we have done, we have been given the gift of wonderful children who have married good people, and produced beautiful, vibrant, healthy Grandchildren, filled with potential.  We could hardly ask for more.   It seemed odd when I realized that I fell in love with her shortly after I turned 19.  I am 67 now.  When I mentioned that to my Daughter, Lisa said she couldn’t remember back to when she was nineteen.  Mary Ann and I have had a lifetime together.  I have said that I have no regrets.  As I think about it, I do regret that we didn’t hug more.  She is too fragile for me to do it, but I just want to hug the stuffings out of her.  (There are no stuffings left to hug out of her — she is skin and bones.)

Don and Edie (and Son Zach) came by to drop off some orange sweet rolls — very tasty.  Don and Zach spent a little time with me talking about how to deal with the pump problem in the waterfall, the Calcium buildup.  Later, Volunteer Coordinator Mary brought by a Tuna Casserole, some of which we enjoyed for supper, along with leftovers from last night’s dinner.

In the evening, I ventured out for the fifteen minutes it takes to get a cup of coffee at PT’s and return home.  One of the owners, the one who travels to visit the locales and the farmers all over the world from whom they buy the coffee beans was there.  Jeff has a wonderful and caring relationship with all those with whom he works to provide the best coffee possible.  I have interacted with him on occasion since we arrived here in 1996.  He handed me his card and told me to call him if we need coffee brought to the house tomorrow.  He would arrange for it or do it himself.  Home delivery is not one of the services coffee shops provide.

Terry, one of Mary Ann’s three friends from childhood phoned this morning to check on her and wish her well.  All three of them and so many others have been checking on her, sending their love, and including her and the rest of our family in their prayers. This is a humbling experience for us — one we, of course, would never have chosen.  It is the capstone of Mary Ann’s life and an experience after which I will never be the same, hopefully a better person for it.

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What will she wear, what songs will be sung, what passages read.  We talked about some of those things years ago when we filled out forms for a Pre-need plan at the local funeral home.  The major decisions are already made.

I have to admit that it is painful even to talk about such things.  It was fine to do so many years ago — not now.  I am refusing to allow it to sink in and touch my gut.  The pain is there, but it is an aching now.  I have tasted it enough to know that the pain will sharpen and overwhelm when it breaks open.  Certainly I will survive as have tens of millions before me.

Friends Mike and Judy came over to spend time with us today.  As always it was a good and meaningful time.  Mary Ann connected with their presence and appreciated it.  Since Mike is the Pastor who will preach at the funeral when it comes, we needed to talk some about that.

Later, Pastor Jim, who followed me as Senior Pastor of the congregation I served for a dozen years, came over to celebrate Holy Communion with us.  There were enough of us to feel like a congregation.  Pastor Jim provided a meaningful ministry through a service of Scripture, prayer and song.  With three Pastors, two Spouses of Pastors and one Daughter of a Pastor, we surprised Jim by knowing the words to the songs (multiple stanzas) by heart.  He didn’t have to sing solo.  We were a choir.

One of the songs we sang is “Beautiful Savior.”  Both Mary Ann and I grew up in the same congregation in Aurora, Illinois.  Every Sunday worship through all the years we were growing up ended with “Beautiful Savior.”  As we gathered around Mary Ann’s bed and worshiped, sang and shared the bread and wine of Holy Communion, there was a peace about what is happening.  Mary Ann was a part of it even if she was not able to sing out loud with us.

With that said, as Son Micah commented later when he arrived, “this is hard.”  It hurts.  It just hurts.

Mary Ann seemed to have a comfortable day.  Last night, I was up a few times to listen for her breathing.  I tried to move her a little to minimize the pressure sore problem.  This morning when Lisa and I changed her, she did not show much evidence of the first stage of pressure sores — just one red spot on her ankle.  It was a relief to me that she seemed to fare well last night.  She does not move at all other than a foot moving a bit once in a while.  That is a formula for bedsores.

One happy surprise was that while Lisa and I were rolling Mary Ann this way and that to change her and check her, it just caught our funny bone.  We started laughing and so did Mary Ann.  It was not audible, but had it been, it would have been a belly laugh.

Lisa headed off for church and a local Art Fair.  I read a bit, then started a new book, titled Broken Open, by Elizabeth Lesser.  It is subtitled “How difficult Times Can Help Us Grow.”  How is that for timely.  It was recommended by the online Lewy Body Dementia Spouses group.

I decided to move into the bedroom to read, just so that I could be with Mary Ann.  It was a pleasant experience.  She seemed comfortable.  I asked how she was doing and she responded audibly that she was okay.  We just had some quiet interaction.  I gave her some water.   I realized just how wonderful it is to be able to spend this time in our lives together at home.

Later in the day, Son-in-Law Denis, arrived to provide Lisa with support and help with the girls.  Denis and the girls will be going back to Louisville on Tuesday.  Son, Micah and Granddaughter Chloe arrived at about the same time as Denis.  This was around the time Mike, Judy and Pastor Jim left.

Lisa and I changed Mary Ann again, examined her for red spots and turned her.  It was disappointing to see some red areas, indicating the potential of pressure sores beginning.  I plan to phone the Hospice Nurse tomorrow about the possibility of a hospital bed with the self adjusting air mattress on it to help avoid the worsening of those spots.

One annoying element in the day was the waterfall simply stopping.  It just stopped.  No one did anything to it.  It just stopped.  I was able to get hold of Brad (through his wife since they were driving) who promised to come after his work tomorrow afternoon to work on it.  Brad installed the pondless waterfall.  I certainly realize just how important a role that addition to our home is now that it is not working.  We built the sun room so that we could see the waterfall!

While Mary Ann is, of course, very vulnerable, and anything could happen at any time, she still seems fairly strong.   She ate a small dish of ice cream this afternoon while lying in bed. The Orthostatic hypotension has been so bad that it is pretty much impossible to sit her up for more that a moment.  Her blood pressure drops and so does she.

We continue to take things as they come, grateful for what we have, hoping for a peaceful release when the time comes.

If you want to write a comment about this or any of the posts on this blog, look to the column on the right side of this page, titled “Recent Posts,”  click on the name of a post and you will find a box at the end of that article in which you can write a comment.  Clicking on the title of the post you are reading will accomplish the same thing.  Comments are appreciated.