About 4am Mary Ann was up.  Then again once an hour until a little before 8am when we got up for the day.  There was some of the intensity that can develop into hallucinations and hyperactivity, but this time it did not get out of hand.

I suggested that after I wash her hair we should head to Perkin’s, where she always orders some pancakes and a couple of slices of bacon.  She liked the idea.  She did have juice and yogurt with her pills as usual, just not the bowl of cereal.  It took a while to get the morning chores done today, so it wasn’t until about noon that we actually headed to Perkin’s.  Then we headed to the grocery.  Even though I had a list, we ended up with more than intended.  Gratefully, it was all things that we routinely use.

During the morning, I began taking her blood pressure every hour or so.  Her blood pressure had been so high and the Cardiologist’s office on Thursday that it was pretty concerning.  Her morning meds included a whole Midodrine tablet with the purpose of keeping her BP up so that she doesn’t faint, on account of the Orthostatic Hypotension that has given her such difficulty.

I started at 8:17am, 220/115.  Then ranging from one hour to three and a half hours apart after that her blood pressure measured, 200/110; 160/85; 185/100; 200/100; 200/105.  I took it one other time when it the systolic was 200, but I didn’t get the diastolic.

I could not bring myself to give her even 1/2 of a Midodrine tablet for her midday and suppertime doses.  I know it is not good to stop meds cold turkey, but it just seemed crazy to give her meds that raise her BP when it was already dangerously high.  One thing that caught my ear was the Cardiologist’s ARNP mentioning the fear of a massive stroke.  I had mentioned that Mary Ann already had a stroke.  Angela responded immediately with that concern.  Mary Ann’s stroke was not a bleed, but a cluster stroke (bits of plaque, probably from the ulcerated lesion on her carotid artery).  Nonetheless, it is hard to accept blood pressure that high without major concern.

The last couple of days there has been some swelling of her feet.  She has not had that problem very often.  When she has had swelling it has gone down the next day.  Two days in a row catches my attention. She has not had the heaviness in her chest and the ARNP, Angela, did not hear any crackling in her lungs, the sign of problems with fluid build up.  I need to remember to weigh Mary Ann in the morning to see if she has gained any weight.  That is another of the signs of potential congestive heart failure.

Today, the hallucinations have emerged a bit.  When she started eating tonight’s two scoops of Baskin & Robbins, she asked Ashy if she wanted any.  She saw our youngest Granddaughter sitting in the transfer chair a couple of feet away from her. That Granddaughter is currently living in Kentucky, not in our dining room.

One of the choices we have to make for the remodel/addition of a Sun Room at the back of our town home will be vertical blinds to cover twelve feet of glass for the sake of privacy.  Stacey brought a sample book of blinds that seem ideal.  Mary Ann has gotten in her mind that there is another sort of blind that would be better.  The problem is, it does not exist.  She looked through the latest Martha Stewart magazine and has become convinced that she sees there what we should choose.  She said there are many examples throughout the magazine.  I paged through the entire magazine with her. There were a couple of pages that had what she decided she liked.  They were pictures of an open porch with no blinds, just greenery, vines and bushes in the yard the porch is overlooking.  Then on another page she pointed to some large pictures of pink and red nail polish she said were the weights at the bottom of the blinds.

I could do nothing but tell her that we could not find blinds that exist only in her mind but do not exist in a way that we could actually buy and install.  This one is going to be tough.  I have absolutely no doubt that as long as we live, she will  routinely mention that we did not get the blinds she wanted for those windows and sliding glass doors.

Mary Ann’s ability to feed herself simply was gone today.  At breakfast, I assisted her as she worked to get the pills into her mouth.  I fed her the yogurt and held the cup and straw to her mouth.  At the restaurant at lunch, after I buttered them, cut the pancakes into bite sized pieces and put syrup on them, she got the fork in her hand with my help and was determined to eat the meal herself.  After an interminable amount of time, in which I had long since eaten my entire meal, she was still frozen in place with her hand lying in the pancakes, holding her fork wwith her head down near the plate.  On occasion she tried to get the pancakes up to and into her mouth, but no pancakes ever remained on the fork long enough to make it in.

I offered to help a number of times.  A couple of times I moved her hand with the fork in it so that some pieces were stuck on the fork.  She still could not seem to get them to her mouth.  Finally, she agreed to let me put each fork full into her mouth.  I did the same with the bacon, and with the straw in her Coke.  She ate most of the food on the plate.

At supper at home the same thing happened, she could not get the food to her mouth.  What seems strange to me is that she refused to let me help her even though we were in a completely private setting.  She ate almost nothing.  When I returned with the ice cream from B&R, she could not manage that on her own either.  After a while she did let me help her eat the ice cream.  I can only guess that she really likes pancakes, bacon and ice cream, so she allowed my help.  She was not so fond of the ham and cheesy potatoes at supper, so she was not so motivated to accept the help.

After getting back from the grocery this afternoon, I worked on filling the pill containers for the week, while Mary Ann watched television.  Her head was hanging on her lap much of the time.  One of the times I came over to help her sit up, she said one of the things that always triggers feelings of guilt and some helplessness.  I don’t remember her words exactly, but message was: I am bored sitting here all the time doing nothing but watching television, and I am just wasting away.  The implication was: you aren’t providing me with enough activity and stimulation to provide a decent quality of life for me.

I have talked about this in earlier posts.  I do feel guilty about not providing her with more attention and engagement.  My rationalization is that my life already revolves around her wants and needs all day every day and all night every night.   There are two truths that sort of intertwine as I process what she said.  One is that I really should do more to engage her attention and improve the quality of her days.  The other is that she has Parkinson’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease Dementia and there are resulting consequences and limitations that I cannot fix.  I cannot give her the life that has been taken from her by the disease.

One goal in processing this issue is to keep my feet to the fire to try to come up with things that will keep her interest.  My hope was that the lunch out and the trip to the grocery would help.  Tomorrow I hope to get both of us going early enough to make it to the 11am worship service followed by a meal out at a nice restaurant that we both like.  Then later in the day will come the Superbowl.  She loves professional football and will enjoy watching the game.

The other goal in processing this issue is to accept my own flaws and imperfections and let go of the guilt and frustration that I am not doing more.  This has actually been a better than average week in one regard in particular.  I don’t think I have said a cross word to Mary Ann this week, nor have I felt like doing so.  Sunday morning’s experience seems to have had some residual effect.  I have no illusions that the change in attitude will remain, but it has felt good to set Grumpy Caregiver aside for a few days.

If you want to write a comment about this or any of the posts on this blog, look to the column on the right side of this page, titled “Recent Posts,”  click on the name of a post and you will find a box at the end of that article in which you can write a comment.  Clicking on the title of the post you are reading will accomplish the same thing.  Comments are appreciated.

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It is just too soon to tell.  Mary Ann is now taking two medicines to help control the fainting due to low blood pressure when standing (Orthostatic Hypotension).  One is the standard med prescribed to control the bouts with fainting, Midodrine.  The second is a medicine prescribed off-label for helping control the BP.

I just read a post on the online of Spouse Caregivers of those with Lewy Body Dementia.  That post had specifics about their larger dose of the new med.  I have been thinking lately just how helpful it has been to be a part of that online group.

The group is a place where those who are in the throes of very difficult caregiving can vent without judgment.  In fact the opposite of judgment comes.  There are words of acceptance, affirmation of the validity of the feelings of those venting. Everyone in the group understands the crazy ups and downs that come with this disease.

Reading the many hundreds of posts over the last year or two has helped me handle things that might have frustrated me more had I not known what to expect.  I knew not only from past experience but from the group that the aftermath of the hospital stay might be a problem.

We can ask one another how her/his Loved One reacted to a particular medicine or dosage of that med.  Even alternative medications can be discovered in the posts.  There are some who see a particular doctor at the Mayo Clinic who specializes in Lewy Body Dementia.

We can talk with one another about waste management issues without having any concern for speaking in an indelicate way.  There are things that can be shared there that would not be appropriate in a blog like this.  We can talk in ways that might scare those who were not going through this particular challenge.

One thing I have gained by reading those online posts is perspective on Mary Ann’s and my situation.  The struggles of some in the group are beyond imagination.   We are among those who have been dealing with Parkinson’s the longest, but others have been dealing with the dementia much longer than we have.  Not all the spouses have Parkinson’s, but all have some form of Lewy Body Dementia or a related diagnosis.  For some the dementia has reached the last stages, where we are in the mid-range of the usual progression of the disease.  With that said, the truth is, the disesase vacillates so dramatically, that most of us have seen earlier and later stages of the disease in our Loved One’s at various times – with no warning that a change for the better or for the worse was coming.

With the perspective of the reading those posts, I celebrate how much we are still able to do, the quality of life still available to us.

Mary Ann did reasonably well today.  We slept a little later this morning, a good thing for both of us.  The morning routine is pretty time consuming, leaving too short a time to allow us to participate in a morning filled with activity at church, including a Pancake Breakfast.  We did benefit from some leftovers brought over early in the afternoon.  When she was up in the morning before her nap, she was not at her best.  There were many times that she had her eyes tightly shut as we tried to walk to and from the bathroom.

Mary Ann actually ended up in bed late in the morning for a couple of hours of napping.  After eating some of the leftovers, we went out in the car for a while, ending up with ice cream.  Our first choice for ice cream this afternoon has gone out of business, Maggie Moo’s.  The format is the same as Coldstone Creamery, only with much better quality ice cream.  We ended up at Sonic.

She was pretty alert this afternoon, and headed to bed sometime around 7pm or 7:30pm.  She has been a little restless, but as always, I am hoping for a restful night for both of us.

If you want to write a comment about this or any of the posts on this blog, look to the column on the right side of this page, titled “Recent Posts,”  click on the name of a post and you will find a box at the end of that article in which you can write a comment.  Clicking on the title of the post you are reading will accomplish the same thing.  Comments are appreciated.