In the last Hospice Grief Support Group meeting, the observation was made that for many, the time of Caregiving is a time of grieving that accomplishes some of that task before the Loved One dies.  As I review the Caregiving role, especially the last couple of years of full time Caregiving, it is clear that we lived in denial.  Mary Ann’s denial was palpable.  She simply put out of her mind any thoughts of end times.  It wasn’t that she didn’ t realize what was happening.  On rare occasions, she revealed that at some level she was fully aware of what was coming in the not too distant future. 

She simply chose to engage each day as a living person rather than a dying person.  I chose denial also.  For us it seemed to be the only way to live fully each day.  Living in denial freed us to squeeze the life out of every moment we had together.  My denial was intentional.  When it came to using every tool available to sustain quality of life (more so than quantity), we did that.  I advocated for the best available treatment for her.  Having done that, found the best tools available and used them, denial as a daily mode of operation worked. 

One negative side effect was that I did not do anything to prepare for what to do when the end came.  While it is possible that the intensity of what I have felt, especially in the first ten weeks, could have been lessened in some way by choosing not to live in denial, I do not regret that choice.  Had I not lived in denial, I could not have given Mary Ann the respect she was due as someone fully alive, a force to be reckoned with.  Had I treated her in a sweet and syrupy way, displaying sympathy, feelings of sorrow for her, it would have stolen from her some of her dignity.  While I could be accused of rationalizing my own unwillingness to face the truth, I am convinced that we needed to be 100% alive while we were both alive. 

As to the negative side effect, I consciously chose denial fully aware that just as we were immersed in life until very close to the end, I would have to immerse myself in the grief and deal with it when it was time.  That is what I have been doing.  I still contend that taking on the grief fullyis the best way to get the intense grief work done so that new life can emerge.  That new life will not be free from pain but will allow that life the freedom to include joy again. 

When I was standing at the most beautiful rest area along a highway I have ever seen, I realized that sometimes beautycan hurt.  The rest area was on the shore of Rend Lake in Southern Illinois.  The sky held cirro-cumulus clouds, puffy and whispy, shaped in ways that stimulated the imagination.  There was a breeze that was warm and cool at the same time.  I realize that makes no sense, but that is how it felt.  The weather was perfect, the view impressive.  There was a huge expanse of well-kept grass that held picnic tables on slabs, some covered with a roof.  Some folks I encountered had a picnic supper there.  They always stopped there on their way from Chicago.  I spent about half an hour there, reading for a while, watching birds with my binoculars, walking around enjoying the view.  The experience was also laced with the pain of not being able to share it with Mary Ann.  I have often noticed that for me there is a longing to share with others any experience of profound beauty.  I have appreciated beauty without the pain at times, as when I stood at the top of that mound in the Flint Hills (see former post). 

I would not suggest that the denial we experienced was the way Caregiving should be done.  I can only say that it worked for us.  Would it have been better in any way had we been more realistic and accepting?  There is no way to know.

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