Her vital signs are still good.  It is too soon to give up and simply wait.   Her lungs are clear, her blood pressure is within her normal wide range, heart beat is steady and normal for her, oxygen saturation percentage is good.

She managed to swallow most of her morning pills with a little juice.  She was in bed the rest of the day.  Every two hours I got her to take meds I couldn’t get her to take yesterday.  Tonight, she indicated again that she would eat some ice cream pie.  She ate a small piece.

Then came the dreaded bathroom battle with some messy BM.  The difficulty is at a 10 each time now.  I will do it as long as physically possible.  I can only hope that my muscles will respond by strengthening to match the task. I got her back in bed and shortly thereafter gave her the nighttime pills, which she did manage to swallow, with difficulty.

The last ditch effort is this.  I mentioned it in last night’s post.  I am giving her less Seroquel in hopes she will be able to sleep less during the day and be more alert.  I have begun the Midodrine again to raise her blood pressure to a level that months ago seemed to control the fainting.  I recognize that these changes not likely to make much difference at this point, but the options are simply slipping away.

I managed to get hold of the office of the Psychiatrist that was recommended as one capable of handling this complex a combination of problems.  I was informed that he does not take outpatients.  There is a Physician’s Assistant that works with him who does.  An appointment with her would be at least a month out.  At this point a month is an eternity.  We are focusing on hours and days in determining what to do. The only access to that doctor would come through the inpatient Senior Diagnostics program at the hospital.  I may call and go through the process that determines eligibility for admittance. We are running out of options.

The Hospice Nurse is going to check with the Pharmacist to see how many of the meds might be available in liquid or some other form that would be easier to take.  She is also going to have the Pharmacist see if there are any meds that can be eliminated since they are for long term issues.  For instance, the cholesterol medicine, which is a fairly low dose seems superfluous at this point.

Volunteer Tamara stayed with Mary Ann for a while this afternoon.  I was able to get out and run a couple of errands.  One resulted in the added frustration of replacing a broken wireless network adapter on the computer we have in the living room so that Mary Ann can see pictures of the Grandchildren.  Of course, I can’t get the new adapter to work properly.  The stress of trying to phone someone and spend an hour or two trying to follow directions is just not something I can deal with at the moment.  At this point, little frustrations become huge quickly.  My lack of computer skills is impressive.  I will leave that problem for another time.

Volunteer Tamara asked if the Hospice Nurse had checked Mary Ann for pressure sores.  Now that she is lying in bed all day long every day, that is likely to become a problem soon.  Daughter Lisa has suggested that I turn Mary Ann when she is in bed for a long period of time.  I realized that the Hospice Nurse probably should have picked up on that concern checked for problem areas and offered a hospital bed again.  I will phone and ask about that since I need to ask the Hospice Aide to bring more wipes and chux.  At the Nurse’s suggestion, I am using chux to catch what has almost constantly been coming from Mary Ann’s mouth these last three days.

Since Mary Ann has been sleeping all night long the last few nights, I am not sleep deprived.  I still feel as tired as when the nights were difficult.  I have little doubt that has do to with the mental and emotional drain of accommodating the recent changes and their implications along with the frustrating search for adequate medical support.

One piece of good news is that Daughter Lisa and Granddaughters Abigail and Ashlyn will be arriving tomorrow afternoon.  They plan to stay for a few days.

We have been in uncharted territory for most of the time the Parkinson’s has been around, and certainly since the dementia has joined the fray.  The distance to the end of this uncharted journey seems to be diminishing at a frighteningly rapid pace.  I will continue to search for options, at least while those vital signs stay strong.

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