She was sitting up in the chair in front of the television.  Her head started jerking forward and back up.  Her arms fell to the sides of the transfer chair.  She was out.   She had not stood up, she was just sitting there when it happened.  Medical folks call it Syncope.  You and I call it fainting. passing out. 

Why did it happen?  Her blood pressure dropped until it was no longer high enough to fight the pull of gravity.  There was no longer enough blood pumping to adequately supply her brain. 

It didn’t just happen once, or twice, or three times.  I lost count.  It was probably five or six times, one right after the other.  It has happened before, but never that many times in a row.  Only two or three times before has it happened while sitting down, unless it was right after standing up or walking or trying to get up — not just sitting down.

There is no explanation of which I am aware as to why the blood pressure is too high sometimes and too low other times.  It has been high almost her entire adult life.  That is called Hypertension.  She also has Orthostatic Hypotension.  That means, when she stands up, sometimes the Autonomic Nervous System [ANS] does not trigger the smooth muscles surrounding the arteries quickly enough to constrict to compensate for the additional gravitational pull down on the blood in her circulatory system.  Read the side effects on very many of the common medications we take.  They warn that there may be dizziness when standing up while taking the med.  That dizziness is a moment of Orthostatic Hypotension, low blood pressure when standing up. 

It sometimes happens to folks who have had Parkinson’s Disease for a long time.  It very often happens to those who have a form of Dementia with Lewy Bodies.  Parkinson’s Disease Dementia is one of those forms.  Little bits of material called Lewy Bodies form on brain cells in the part of the brain that runs the Parasympathetic System of the ANS. 

What all that means is that there is an insidious process that makes life still more difficult to some who are already in a very tough battle.  I know what the explanations are for high and low blood pressure in Mary Ann’s circumstances.  What I don’t know, nor does anyone else, is why for many weeks it has hovered at a frighteningly high level with no fainting spells, and now it is running high at times during the day and plummeting at other times. 

She had fainted some earlier this morning when she was up and down, using the commode. When it happens there, I have to hold her up with my shoulder to keep her from slumping forward.   Then after maybe ten or fifteen minutes of multiple times fainting while sitting in her transfer chair in front of the television, the Hospice Aide Sonya arrived for her first time giving Mary Ann a shower, washing her hair and dressing her.   I thought there was not a chance that Sonya would be able to handle her, even with the new shower chair with arms. 

Mary Ann did not faint once during all the ups and downs of getting into the shower chair, transfering back to the transfer chair she sits in during the day.  Why not??  Why does she faint one time and not another.  This is such a nasty disease, refusing to submit to patterns that can be anticipated. 

Now comes the question, do I resume giving her the Midodrine, a medication that raises blood pressure?  Her heart and kidneys are being damaged by high blood pressure.  I will take her BP in the morning and decide what to do.  If it is exceedingly high, I will not give her the Midodrine.  If it is exceedingly low, I will.  Of course, it is not as simple as that.  If her BP is normal, what should I do?  Normal is not high enough to guard against moving too low when she stands.  It often changes from way too high when she first gets up to way too low in an hour. 

This is an old story heard many times by those who have reading these posts since I began writing this blog just about a year ago now.  You have heard me talk about this many times before.  Here it is again.  It no longer scares me.  It just makes it harder to deal with Mary Ann’s penchant for hopping up and heading off, especially when she is hallucinating.  I have to actually sit a few feet from her every moment she is awake and alert, since she will stand and may fall soon thereafter.   She is completely unaware of any concern.  She doesn’t know she has fainted after she has become conscious again. 

She surprised me and slept fairly well last night.  She did all right at breakfast, fainted for a while, had her bath, ate lunch as Hospice Nurse Jennifer filled out some forms and took her BP.  It was 100 over something, still very low.   Mary Ann sat for a while and then headed to the bedroom and slept for four or five hours. 

I got her up for supper.  We went out again to pick up ice cream and a tankard of PT’s coffee to reheat in the morning (I’m a hopeless fan).   Since she was again in pop-up mode, I needed to get her in the car, seat belted in, so that I could relax and know that she was secure.   The ice cream was just an excuse for getting her into a secure place for a while.  You believe that, right?

Not long after eating the ice cream, she headed off to bed.  In spite of the long nap, at least at the moment she is sleeping.  It may not last. 

One of the people in the online Lewy Body Spouses group lost her husband today.  She described in detail the rapid decline and the process of dying.  My words to her were these:

You have been a mainstay in this group for a long time.  You have put words to what we have been experiencing.  You described what awaits us.  My condolences are laced with anticipation, as a result, I feel vividly what you have just experienced and pray for the peace Charlie now has to free you to find peace here, understanding that the peace does not void the pain you feel.  That is the price of love. 
Peter”

Our turn will come.

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